This big guy mostly defoliated my fish hot pepper, and I am 100% ok with that. It’s so cute, and big! Good luck pupating, friend.

This big guy mostly defoliated my fish hot pepper, and I am 100% ok with that. It’s so cute, and big! Good luck pupating, friend.

Facts

Amebix after Gunther on a mix = ultimate cognitive dissonance


Below the Bend in the Appalachians
For decades, geologists have debated the origins of an unmistakable curve in the Appalachian Mountains. Known to experts as the “Pennsylvania salient,” the bend begins in southern New York and northeastern Pennsylvania and extends across Pennsylvania to the border of Maryland. In this area, the ridges of the Appalachians turn from a roughly north-south orientation to an east-west orientation and then north-south again.
A recent study, authored by geologists from the University of Rochester and College of New Jersey, focuses on a block of dense, mafic volcanic rock beneath the bend. The scientists argued that this underground mass forced the mountain chain to shift as it formed hundreds of millions of years ago. As the North American and African plates collided, the North American plate began to fold and thrust upward. However, the mass of volcanic rock became a barrier and forced the mountains to push up around it.
Geologists have known about this mass for some time, but after analyzing new seismic and gravitational data, they concluded that the expanse of volcanic rocks was about 450 kilometers (286 miles) by 100 kilometers (124 miles). “What we didn’t understand was the size of the structure or its implications for mountain-building processes,” said Cynthia Ebinger, one of the study authors.
The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Aqua satellite captured this view of the bend on November 17, 2012. Other physiographic regions are also visible. A portion of the Appalachian Plateaulies to the north of the mountains. The Appalachian Piedmont, a low-elevation plateau in the foothills, lies to the east and transitions into the Atlantic Coastal Plain.

References

Benoit, M. et al (2014, April 28) Orogenic bending around a rigid Proterozoic magmatic rift beneath the Central Appalachian Mountains. Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 402 (15), 197-208.
Commonwealth of Pennsylvania Physiographic Provinces of Pennsylvania. Accessed September 17, 2014.
Geomorphology from Space (1986) Folded Appalachians Accessed September 17, 2014.
Maryland Geologic Survey Physiographic Map of Maryland. Accessed September 17, 2014.
University of Rochester (2014, July 18) Bend in Appalachian mountain chain finally explained. Accessed September 17, 2014.
NASA image courtesy Jeff Schmaltz, LANCE MODIS Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC. Caption by Adam Voiland.
Instrument(s): Aqua - MODIS

Oh hey it’s all my ridges and valleys! We have a story for each; Bald Eagle, Sugar, Nippenose, Nittany, Evitts. SEOH can be magical, but north central PA will always have a special place in my heart.

Below the Bend in the Appalachians

For decades, geologists have debated the origins of an unmistakable curve in the Appalachian Mountains. Known to experts as the “Pennsylvania salient,” the bend begins in southern New York and northeastern Pennsylvania and extends across Pennsylvania to the border of Maryland. In this area, the ridges of the Appalachians turn from a roughly north-south orientation to an east-west orientation and then north-south again.

A recent study, authored by geologists from the University of Rochester and College of New Jersey, focuses on a block of dense, mafic volcanic rock beneath the bend. The scientists argued that this underground mass forced the mountain chain to shift as it formed hundreds of millions of years ago. As the North American and African plates collided, the North American plate began to fold and thrust upward. However, the mass of volcanic rock became a barrier and forced the mountains to push up around it.

Geologists have known about this mass for some time, but after analyzing new seismic and gravitational data, they concluded that the expanse of volcanic rocks was about 450 kilometers (286 miles) by 100 kilometers (124 miles). “What we didn’t understand was the size of the structure or its implications for mountain-building processes,” said Cynthia Ebinger, one of the study authors.

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Aqua satellite captured this view of the bend on November 17, 2012. Other physiographic regions are also visible. A portion of the Appalachian Plateaulies to the north of the mountains. The Appalachian Piedmont, a low-elevation plateau in the foothills, lies to the east and transitions into the Atlantic Coastal Plain.

NASA image courtesy Jeff Schmaltz, LANCE MODIS Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC. Caption by Adam Voiland.

Instrument(s): Aqua - MODIS

Oh hey it’s all my ridges and valleys! We have a story for each; Bald Eagle, Sugar, Nippenose, Nittany, Evitts. SEOH can be magical, but north central PA will always have a special place in my heart.

(Source: earth-as-art)

libutron:

Autumn Allium Duo | ©Kirsten Chursinoff 
Textile Art - Allium flowers embroidered by machine. Black beads sewn by hand. On a background of well over a hundred different fabrics (8”x10” - 17” x 21” framed).

libutron:

Autumn Allium Duo | ©Kirsten Chursinoff 

Textile Art - Allium flowers embroidered by machine. Black beads sewn by hand. On a background of well over a hundred different fabrics (8”x10” - 17” x 21” framed).

heaveninawildflower:

" The strawberry grows underneath the nettle’ (1906) illustration by Walter Crane (1845–1915 ) for ‘Flowers from Shakespeare’s Garden.’ Published by Cassell & Co.
Image and text courtesy MFA Boston.

Words to remember.

heaveninawildflower:

" The strawberry grows underneath the nettle’ (1906) illustration by Walter Crane (1845–1915 ) for ‘Flowers from Shakespeare’s Garden.’ Published by Cassell & Co.

Image and text courtesy MFA Boston.

Words to remember.

Cactus flowers in Capitol Park, Sacramento. I love the metallic green bee on the last one!

Whorled milkweed (Asclepias verticillata) at Clifton Gorge

Whorled milkweed (Asclepias verticillata) at Clifton Gorge

Things I ate at ESA pt 4: Tan tan men ramen at Shoki Ramen house.

Things I ate at ESA pt 4: Tan tan men ramen at Shoki Ramen house.

Things I ate at ESA pt 3: Pizza with gorgonzola dulce, pears, and honey at Hot Italian.

Things I ate at ESA pt 3: Pizza with gorgonzola dulce, pears, and honey at Hot Italian.

Things I ate at ESA pt. 2: Tom kha soup and drunken noodles at The Coconut Midtown (yes I went here for 2 lunches in a row!)

Things I ate at ESA pt. 2: Tom kha soup and drunken noodles at The Coconut Midtown (yes I went here for 2 lunches in a row!)

I am back from Sacramento AND I have internet at home again!

Things I ate at ESA pt 1: Fresh roll and green curry at The Coconut Midtown

arsvitaest:

"The Old Pine, Darien, Connecticut"
Author: John Frederick Kensett (American, 1816-1872)Date: 1872Medium: Oil on canvasLocation: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

arsvitaest:

"The Old Pine, Darien, Connecticut"

Author: John Frederick Kensett (American, 1816-1872)
Date: 1872
Medium:
Oil on canvas
Location: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

(via theherbarium)

poboh:

Moonlight, 1889, Henri-Joseph Harpignies. French (1819 - 1916)

poboh:

Moonlight, 1889, Henri-Joseph Harpignies. French (1819 - 1916)

(via kevin-bacon-casserole)

Opening of Amorphophallus paeonifolius

nemfrog:

Protea divaricata L. The botanist’s repository [H.C. Andrews], vol. 7 (1806-1807)

nemfrog:

Protea divaricata L. The botanist’s repository [H.C. Andrews], vol. 7 (1806-1807)

(via theherbarium)